Community Profile: Terry Anderson

December 21, 2017 by Christine Moir

Each month we want to highlight members of our community who are supporting Minneapolis parks through their involvement with the Parks Foundation. We are inspired by the people who care for and use our parks and we want to recognize the many individuals and organizations who make our system incredible through their generosity. Thank you!

This month, we hear from Terry Anderson.


Tell us about a favorite childhood memory of being in a park (it doesn’t have to be in Minneapolis).
Here is one of my first memories and the first of being in a park. I was about four years old. Dad came home one day with a cane fishing pole and we walked down to the lagoon at “Lake-n-a-komis” (translation of my 4-year-old pronunciation = Lake Nokomis). I was thrilled! What an adventure!

What park experiences do/would you like to share with out-of-town guests?
We have our own “Mini Round” from Nicollet Island to Water Power Park and over the Stone Arch Bridge through the Mill District. We often find people looking lost – visitors – and offer directions or a short tour and we are seldom turned down! Also, Minnehaha Falls is especially a favorite of kids.

Why do you support the Minneapolis Parks Foundation?
Because they “get it” = the importance of places to play, to gather, to relax, enjoy the beauty and surprises of nature in or very near their neighborhood. I would love to have every child and family experience memories in the public parks throughout their lives as I have. By supporting the Parks Foundation, I get to be a part of making that happen. The Mississippi River is a continuous opportunity through the city for people of all ages to be near the water, in the water, by the water, close to nature and their neighbors. Now, RiverFirst is going to extend access through Minneapolis and restore the riverfront for recreation.

Why are parks important to Minneapolis?
If we open our eyes, parks show people what they have in common – the enjoyment of a place of beauty, relaxation, playing with family and friends, playing in a ball game, teaching a child to swim or learn to play nicely with everyone. Public parks should provide that opportunity for people of all ages and from all neighborhoods for free! No cost – no barriers. The fresh air and beauty of open space is as important as activities. In the heart of the city, I was awed when I saw an eagle catch a fish for breakfast!

Trails, beaches or playgrounds?
The variety of parks and recreation spaces make Minneapolis almost infinitely diverse with each season, offering something for every interest and bringing people together from all parts of the city to enjoy common interests.

Featured image courtesy of Terry Anderson

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